Automated High-Temperature Durability Tests

Engine and exhaust systems are exposed to extremely high temperature and vibration loads. Durability tests are performed by applying controlled vibration levels combined with very high temperatures. Duplicating these conditions can be a challenge: It requires an electrodynamic vibration exciter, a burner system which produces the hot gas flow for bringing the specimen to operating temperature and a data acquisition system.

Integrated Solution for Reliable Durability Testing in High Temperatures

m+p international provides a new integrated solution for combined durability testing, with a single point of control for the entire system. This single interface works with the hot gas generator, the vibration controller and the data acquisition system allowing any signal in the system to be permanently recorded and checked. An OPC remote control interface for the temperature controller is provided to attain and monitor accurate temperature and flow profiles and to guarantee the specifications are met. In addition, a multitude of data channels including thermocouples, pressure, voltages or digital conditions are captured and monitored continuously.

Automation Increases Accuracy, Throughput and Safety

Automation increases test throughput, repeatability and test accuracy and offers unattended true 24/7 operation with immediate feedback and remote access to the test condition that may have stopped the test. Several vibration labs have recently automated their test rigs for durability testing under high temperature by using m+p international’s integrated control, data acquisition and monitoring system. Albert Luo, director of Dynamics Vibration Testing in Springfield, Illinois, comments, “We have used all the available controllers on the market and m+p provides the only integrated hot vib system along with a best-in-class single and multiple axis controller. m+p truly listens to the customer

Read more in the article “Automated durability tests”, Automotive Testing International, November 2017.

 

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